Geobaubles 2019

Here they are, petrological themed Christmas decorations for December 2019! This year we have (clockwise from top left) a green schist from the Cyclades, a basalt from Santorini, peridotite from Oman and essexite from Crawfordjohn, Scotland. The star is shonkinite from Shonkin Sag. Enjoy! Do post pictures of your geobaubles in use on Twitter (tag @R_Siddall) or Instagram  (@ruthie.siddall) and use the hashtag #geobaubles2019

For best effect, print off two sheets, out out the shapes and glue them back to back to attain all-round petrology glamour!

Merry Christmas!


Previous year’s Geobaubles are available here:

Christmas 2018

Christmas 2016 & 2017

 

Geology on Postage Stamps: #1 Energy Resources, Great Britain 1978

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This set of GB commemorative stamps was issued on 25th January 1978, the first issue of commemoratives for that year. The make the link between energy and geology in a world when alternative energies were a mere twinkle in most peoples eyes.

They were designed by Peter Murdoch (b. 1940) and depict symbols representing energy; oil, coal, gas and (nuclear) electricity coupled with stylised depictions of geological structures and strata associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

The stamps were printed by Harrison & Sons for the Post Office.

Prehistoric Animals: A series of illustrations by David Roland

I bought this set of postcards when I was a kid in the 1970s. I can’t remember exactly where I bought them, but it was probably Manchester Museum. They were produced by scientific illustrator David Roland for Birmingham Museum and Art Galleries and represent what was then state-of-the-art interpretations of the appearance of dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals, including Dimtetrodon and Pteranodons. All are very green and scaly. What impressed me at the time, though, is that they all fitted together to make a single, continuous panorama. I loved them!

Featured are: Dimetrodon, Stegosaurus, Diplodocus, Brontosaurus, Iguanodon, Pteranodon, a portly Tyrannosaurus Rex and Triceratops.